Ferrell Collection Of Edgefield Pottery Soars At Wooten & Wooten Auction

The top lot of the auction, that was cataloged as “possibly Thomas Chandler” was a stoneware jar incised “Phoenix Factory” below one of its handles, that achieved $90,000. The monumental jar (19½ inches tall) with four handles, circa 1840, has ornate brushed iron slip decoration of loops and flowers between each of its handles.

CAMDEN, S.C. — Wooten & Wooten Auctioneers’ January 25 sale of the Ferrell collection of stoneware offered great examples that brought great prices. The Ferrells were known for their keen interest in Edgefield, S.C., pottery.

The sale started off on a strong note when a rare stoneware face jug, attributed to the Davies pottery, Edgefield District, S.C., fetched $43,200, which was followed two lots later by another face jug, a rare and diminutive form, 3 inches tall. It made $33,600.

Another standout in the auction that crossed the block early on was an important slip decorated water cooler by Thomas Chandler, Edgefield District, S.C., circa 1850. The two-handled cooler, stamped Chandler/Maker, has a wonderful celadon glaze and has decorations of repeating flowers and sprigs shown under a line and swagged loops. At 20 inches tall, this large piece is noteworthy and has been included in several museum exhibitions. Opening at $34,000, the cooler attained $78,000.

The top lot of the auction, which was cataloged as “possibly Thomas Chandler,” was a jar incised “Phoenix Factory” below one of its handles, that achieved $90,000. The monumental jar (19½ inches tall) with four handles, circa 1840, has ornate brushed iron slip decoration of loops and flowers between each of its handles.

Two fine storage jars, each lug-handled, by Thomas Chandler, also performed well. The first, possibly unique, was signed in iron slip, dated 1844, and fetched $13,200, while a rare signed kaolin slip decorated example took $12,000. The latter jar is circa 1845 and has a prominent kaolin loop and swag decoration.

A choice pitcher, attributed to Colin Rhodes Factory, Edgefield, S.C., circa 1850, having fine brushed iron and trailed kaolin slip decoration, brought $52,800. Standing 10½ inches tall, this piece has the fine two-color decoration on its central leafy decoration that is among the most desirable of Edgefield stoneware.

Attributed to the Colin Rhodes Factory was an important jar, circa 1850, with the decoration of a hoop-skirted woman with two starlike symbols above her. The lug-handled storage jar realized $50,400, and the verso also has a stylized flower, underneath which is an unusual, incised name “M Rhodes.” A fine half-gallon decorated jug that earned $21,600, was circa 1850 and had elaborate kaolin decoration of branching stems and flowers, as well as an ornate cartouche with a “1/2” inside to indicate the jug’s capacity.

Other standouts from this factory included a fine lug-handled jar with ornate kaolin slip decoration of flowers and branching leaves on both the front and back side, which made $20,400; and a lovely jug that was signed “C. Rhodes/Maker” in kaolin slip script, going out at $30,000. The latter piece, circa 1850, is a 3-gallon jug as indicated by a slip-decorated “3” inside a cartouche.

From the Abner Landrum, Pottersville Stone Manufactory came an important and possibly unique, stoneware bottle, that was bid up to $57,600. The circa 1820 bottle, standing 8¼ inches tall, was accompanied by a document signed by Abner Landrum, which indicates the bottle’s inscription “A. Landrum” was done in his hand. It was exhibited in “The Potter’s Eye” in 2005 at the North Carolina Museum of Art.

Also performing well was a large and important, signed and dated jar by David Drake, Lewis Miles Stony Bluff Pottery, 1857. Having large lug handles, a thin mottled glaze and two vertical lines with 12 small slashes on the verso, probably indicating capacity, the jar attained $33,600.

All prices reported include the buyer’s premium. For information, 866-570-0144 or www.wootenandwooten.com.

A choice stoneware pitcher, attributed to Colin Rhodes Factory, Edgefield, S.C., circa 1850, having fine brushed iron and trailed kaolin slip decoration, brought $52,800.

The sale started off on a strong note when a rare stoneware face jug, attributed to the Davies pottery, Edgefield District, S.C., fetched $43,200.

A rare kaolin slip-decorated storage jar with lug handles, Thomas Chandler, circa 1845, sold for $12,000. The jar has a striking kaolin loop and swag decoration and is stamped “Trapp & Chandler.”

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